JORDAN, MENA
Afaf Jabiri

Afaf Jabiri

‘Through the last 20 years of working with women victims/survivors of violence, either directly as a director of women’s hotline and shelter in Jordan or as an advocate for legal reform and social change in the Arab region, I have realized that for the issue of violence against women (VAW) to be seriously tackled there should be an acknowledgment of the inter sectional nature of women’s subordination. This consideration is to address the ways in which women’s subordinate status in the family and in the laws that govern family relationships impacts upon women’s low  representation in politics and labor force, and inevitably contributes in normalizing and perpetuating various forms of violence that women face in their everyday life. Consequently, a binding norm to end violence against women is a necessity to recognize the complex entangled relationship between violence that takes place  at the private domain and the one that women experience in the public sphere. A binding norm is also imperative to address the role and responsibilities of state’s apparatus, be it religion, tribes, education, or law, in legitimating and regulating VAW. By doing so, such a binding norm will be hoped to switch the understanding of VAW from the cultural authenticity claim, which, by all means, subsidizes the founding legitimate grounds for the acts of violence, to the politics and role of the state and its different institutions and thus binds states to effectively establish an adequate legal frameworks to end VAW.’

All Members